New study shows fresh food diet reduces levels of hormone disruptors BPA and DEHP


There are plenty of reasons to avoid processed food and to include more fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet. That list just got a little longer.

Silent Spring Institute researchers teamed up with Breast Cancer Fund to investigate whether levels of the hormone disrupting chemicals BPA and the phthalate DEHP in people’s bodies could be reduced by switching to a fresh food diet that avoids canned food and plastic food packaging.

The study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Health Perspectives, shows that food packaging is the major source of exposure to BPA and DEHP in children and adults, and a fresh food diet reduces levels of these chemicals by half, after just three days.


Families like the Laurlunds were asked to give up canned food, food packaged in plastic, and restaurant meals for three days. When study families switched to the fresh food diet, their levels of the hormone disruptors BPA and DEHP dropped by half.

The good news is that this study provides evidence that replacing these chemicals with safer alternatives in food packaging would significantly reduce our exposures. And it provides information you can use now to play it safe and reduce your exposure.

Resources

Press release: New study shows fresh food diet reduces levels of hormone disruptors BPA and DEHP

Tip sheet: 6 Simple Steps to Avoid BPA and Phthalates

Fact sheet: Food packaging study

Graph: BPA levels decline during 3-day fresh food diet

Graph: Phthalate levels decline during 3-day fresh food diet

Video: Meet the study team

Article in Environmental Health Perspectives

Response to industry comments

This study was funded by the Science Innovation Fund, Passport Foundation, and the Susan S. Bailis Breast Cancer Research Fund at Silent Spring Institute.