Good to the Last Drop

Good to the Last Drop
Good to the Last Drop

TRY THIS AT HOME

Brew the old-fashioned way. BPA and phthalates often appear in the plastic containers and tubing of automatic coffee makers. Instead, consider using a French press to brew your coffee.

Eat in. Studies have shown that people who eat more meals prepared outside the home have higher BPA levels. To reduce your exposure, cook more meals at home with fresh ingredients. When you do eat out, choose restaurants that use fresh ingredients.

Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical often used in hard plastic bottles and the epoxy resin lining of food and beverage cans, has been associated in laboratory studies with breast and prostate cancer and the development of neurological disorders.

Working with Breast Cancer Fund colleagues, Silent Spring Institute researchers studied five families, each with two adults and two children. The results showed that reducing reliance on food packaging can eliminate a substantial source of exposure to BPA. In just three days, the participants’ urine levels of BPA fell by half. The highest exposure levels dropped by more than 75 percent.