Caught Napping

Caught Napping
Caught Napping

TRY THIS AT HOME

Keep down dust. Vacuum regularly with a vacuum cleaner fitted with a HEPA filter. Wipe surfaces with a wet cloth or mop.

Wash your hands frequently. Hand washing does more than prevent the spread of germs; it also reduces the amount of flame retardants entering your body. Remember to use regular soap and water instead of antibacterial soaps, which may contain endocrine disrupting chemicals.

Residues from flame retardants banned from children’s pajamas in the late 1970s—including a chemical identified as a breast carcinogen—have been found to linger in homes decades later.

In a 2012 study of flame retardants in household dust in California, Silent Spring Institute researchers detected TDBPP (brominated “Tris”) in 75 percent of the homes. This chemical was banned in children’s sleepwear in 1977 because of its potential to cause cancer. The breakdown products of TDBPP damage DNA and cause breast tumors in animal studies, raising concern about breast cancer in people.